Archive | February, 2009

Silicon Valley executives to secretly meet with P&G

26 Feb

An invitation only meeting will take place in Cincinnati next month hosted by comsumer goods giant, Procter & Gamble.

At least for one night, Cincinnati is becoming the next Silicon Valley, as Procter & Gamble Co. summons the biggest names in digital and social media — including top executives from Google, Facebook, MySpace and Twitter — to its headquarters March 9 for a so-called Digital Night.

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Experts warn that social sites harm brains

24 Feb

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  • facebook logo | Photo 04
  • SHAQ TWITTERONIA
  • Twestival logo (screenshot)
  • Twitter Capacity
  • picking up steam
  • Branch office Wednesday

I got half way through this article but then got distracted…

Social networking websites are causing alarming changes in the brains of young users, an eminent scientist has warned.

Sites such as Facebook, Twitter and Bebo are said to shorten attention spans, encourage instant gratification and make young people more self-centred.

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Last.fm: “Techcrunch are full of sh*t”

23 Feb

Last.fm, a fantastic service that streams commercial-free music over the net has come out swinging against allegations made by TechCrunch that they are giving away member information to help the record industry police piracy.  They write:

On Friday night a technology blog called Techcrunch posted a vicious and completely false rumour about us: that Last.fm handed data to the RIAA so they could track who’s been listening to the “leaked” U2 album.

I denied it vehemently on the Techcrunch article, as did several other Last.fm staffers. We denied it in the Last.fm forums, on twitter, via email – basically we denied it to anyone that would listen, and now we’re denying it on our blog.

Photos

CD rack containig some original CDs and...

CD rack containig some original CDs and…

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uploaded by nike6

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Is the tech recession over?

18 Feb

Photos

the "new" phone

the "new" phone

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uploaded by SLFM

Let’s not get too excited by this but it’s the first good news I’ve seen in a while.

OK, it’s just one data point. All I know is sales of FogBugz and Copilot. But what I’m seeing is this: October-December 2008 were terrible—sales were 20% lower than usual—but starting January 5th, we saw a significant bounce back to the same level of sales as we had before this recession started, and it’s continued to this day.

This could be a fluke; it might not reflect any reality. Or it could be a sign that tech firms, for the moment, are doing reasonably well. The Joel on Software job board is holding steady at about 50 jobs listed, down from a peak around 100, but there are still a significant number of openings for great developers.

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Gordon Campbell government decimates BC arts

18 Feb

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Vancouver Art Gallery

Vancouver Art Gallery

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uploaded by DennisTT

The BC Government clearly has the same level of sophistication as the Federal Government when it comes to understanding the value of the arts.  Last year the Feds systematically tried to stifle the arts nationally, particularly those who objected to their policies.  Today’s budget speech erased virtually all arts support from the Provincial Government.

Today’s B.C. government budget includes draconian cuts to the arts.

According to the estimates, which break down expenses on a ministry-by-ministry basis, provincial government arts funding will decline by nearly 40 percent in the coming fiscal year.

The idea that the arts don’t contribute to a region’s economic development is the completely false.  What makes a great city like London or New York?  What makes the California economy the same size as all of Canada?  Well, for starters these centers have great architecture, art galleries, film studios, media empires and other arts industries.  These attract talented people from all over the world who bring their international talents.  This is how you build culture.  A country or a province is not a photocopy shop where good management comes from squeezing a few dollars out of the toner bill.  Governments exist to create an environment that inspires and supports.   By cutting funding to the Arts the BC Government is exhibiting the same short sighted thinking as the Feds and the price we will all pay will be a more impoverished existence.

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Is Bell Canada trying to kill NowPublic?

17 Feb

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20071014_4708.jpg

20071014_4708.jpg

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uploaded by Dan Edelstein

Steve Anderson of Save Our Internet, asks:

Will the next NowPublic, Rabble.ca, or Raincity Studios be scared away by the impending ISP gatekeepers?”

He’s talking about Bell and other carriers are controlling people’s access to their favourite websites and online services.  He says:

The open Internet is under threat by the very companies that bring it into our homes and workplaces—Internet service providers. These big telecommunications companies want to become gatekeepers of the Internet, deciding on-line winners and losers, and making our on-line choices for us. Big telecom companies are trying to do away with the governing guidelines of the Internet called “Net neutrality” (or “common carriage”). Net neutrality requires that ISPs not discriminate between content and services. Net neutrality protects our ability to direct our own on-line activities, and also maintains a level playing field for on-line innovation.

Bell Canada and other major Internet service providers are already slowing down (“throttling”) on-line peer-to-peer applications. In essence, this means we, the users of the Internet, already do not have access to all the Internet has to offer. If you’re trying to watch a CBC show on-line and it takes a day to download, as audience members reported last February, the limitations are quite real. In addition to manipulating its own customers’ use of the Internet, Bell also “shapes” traffic passing through its network from independent ISPs like Teksavvy Solutions, thereby also limiting one of its few competitors from offering open access to the Internet.

So if you don’t want the Internet to start looking like your TV or costing as much as your cell phone then you should do something about it.  Let the CRTC know that a free and open net is something you value.  If you don’t, the Internet you now know and love may not survive.

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Is Bell Canada trying to kill NowPublic?

17 Feb

Photos

20071014_4708.jpg

20071014_4708.jpg

see more

uploaded by Dan Edelstein

Steve Anderson of Save Our Internet asks:

“Will the next NowPublic, Rabble.ca, or Raincity Studios be scared away by the impending ISP gatekeepers?”

He’s talking about Bell and other carriers are controlling people’s access to their favourite websites and online services.  He says:

The open Internet is under threat by the very companies that bring it into our homes and workplaces—Internet service providers. These big telecommunications companies want to become gatekeepers of the Internet, deciding on-line winners and losers, and making our on-line choices for us. Big telecom companies are trying to do away with the governing guidelines of the Internet called “Net neutrality” (or “common carriage”). Net neutrality requires that ISPs not discriminate between content and services. Net neutrality protects our ability to direct our own on-line activities, and also maintains a level playing field for on-line innovation.

Bell Canada and other major Internet service providers are already slowing down (“throttling”) on-line peer-to-peer applications. In essence, this means we, the users of the Internet, already do not have access to all the Internet has to offer. If you’re trying to watch a CBC show on-line and it takes a day to download, as audience members reported last February, the limitations are quite real. In addition to manipulating its own customers’ use of the Internet, Bell also “shapes” traffic passing through its network from independent ISPs like Teksavvy Solutions, thereby also limiting one of its few competitors from offering open access to the Internet.

So if you don’t want the Internet to start looking like your TV or costing as much as your cell phone then you should do something about it.  Let the CRTC know that a free and open net is something you value.  If you don’t, the Internet you now know and love may not survive.

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